Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Murph Prep

Murph Prep by Margaux Alvarez

6 WEEKS TO A BETTER MURPH
With Memorial Day only 6 weeks away Alex and I agreed to do Murph while down in San Diego for the California Regional.
If you are there come say hi 
Don't think you are ready for Murph but want to give it a Gaux here is what Alex will be doing to prepare. If your goal is to RX try this program with your vest. Good Luck!
WEEK 1 
WEDNESDAY 
21 PULL UPS + 200M RUN + 15 PULL UPS + 200M RUN +9 PULL UPS + 200M RUN
FRIDAY
400M RUN + 10 PULL UPS  REST 2 MIN X 4 
SUNDAY
15 MIN CHILL PACE RUN 30 IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCED RUNNER
WEEK 2
MONDAY
10 MIN AMRAP
5 PULL UPS + 10 PUSH UPS + 15 AIR SQUATS
WEDNESDAY
200M RUN
15 PULL UPS + 25 AIR SQUATS
400 M RUN
15 PULL UPS + 25 AIR SQUATS
200 M RUN 
FRIDAY
400M RUN + 50 AIR SQUATS REST 2 MIN X 4 
SUNDAY
20 MIN RUN
40 MIN EXPERIENCED
WEEK 3
MONDAY
10 MIN AMRAP
10 PULL UPS +20 PUSH UPS + 30 AIRSQUATS
WEDNESDAY
400M RUN
25 PULL UPS + 50 AIR SQUATS
X 2 ROUNDS
FRIDAY
400M RUN + 15 C2B REST 2 MIN X 2
800 M RUN + MAX PULL UPS REST 3 MIN X 2 
SUNDAY

22 MIN CHILL RUN
42 EXPERIENCED
WEEK 4 
MONDAY
15 MIN AMRAP
400M RUN
20 PULL UPS + 30 PUSH UPS + 40 AIR SQUATS
WEDNESDAY

800 M RUN
50 PULL UPS
800 M RUN
75 PUSH UPS
800 M RUN
150 AIR SQUATS
FRIDAY

800M RUN + 15 PULL UPS
REST 3 MIN X 2
1 MILE RUN 
SUNDAY

25 MIN CHILL RUN
45 MIN EXPERIENCED 
WEEK 5 
MONDAY

15 MIN AMRAP
400M RUN
20 PULL UPS + 40 PUSH UPS + 60 AIR SQUATS
800 M RUN
30 PULL UPS + 60 PUSH UPS + 90 AIR SQUATS
1200 M RUN
40 PULL UPS + 90 PUSH UPS + 120 AIR SQUATS
WEDNESDAY
800 M RUN
100 AIR SQUATS + 50 PUSH UPS + 50 PULL UPS + 50 PUSH UPS + 100 AIR SQUATS
800 M RUN 
FRIDAY
800 M REST 2 MIN X 2 ROUNDS
1600 M REST 5 MIN X 2 ROUNDS 
SUNDAY
30 MIN CHILL
50 MIN EXPERIENCED 
WEEK 6 
MONDAY
1600M RUN
10 MIN AMRAP
5 PULL UPS + 10 PUSH UPS + 15 AIRSQUATS
1600M RUN 
WEDNESDAY REST
FRIDAY REST
SATURDAY - MURPH

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Man Up


Jimwendler.com

Time to Man Up



Note: This article, Time to Man Up, appeared about 6 years ago.  I don't remember the exact scenario but this was originally written in response to a question on the JimWendler Forum; I believe the original question had something to do with struggling with a lack of confidence in life / in relationships.
I’m going to have to give you some Tough Love here. First, I need for you to re-read this:
“Where performance and kicking ass are more important than how you look. Where people eat to live, not live to eat. Where trucks are pushed and sleds are pulled. Where reps and weight are counted, calories are not. Where running isn’t “cardio" , it’s part of training and if you’re going to walk for your conditioning you best have something on your back or in your hands” 
You admit that you are not strong enough (many of us feel this way but understand that it is an ongoing process and that THIS process is important). But please DO NOT be that guy who talks about where he holds his fat or how his legs or “obliques” are fattier than they should be.
What I would prescribe for you is to get rid of all these silly, pathetic and disgusting notions of what you think a man should look like and start over. I’m going to give everyone a huge hint here: no one gives a shit what you look like. Now I’m not saying being a fat slob doesn’t raise some eyebrows in disgust, but if you kick as much ass as possible in the weight room and conditioning field AND start OWNING your training, you'll be farther along than most. Give yourself a full year of total commitment; don't get overwhelmed by fads.  Choose a path, a balanced path, and start moving forward.  One day at a time, one set at a time, one rep at a time.  I don't care so much about WHAT you do, more than you are doing something consistently and something you believe in.
People are not attracted to vanity – they are attracted to confidence, passion and life movement. No one owns a room by the way they look; it’s how they carry themselves. There is so much more to this, but PLEASE don’t talk about your love handles. Act on your passions in life, move boulders, read, be polite, further your education, minimize personal and financial debt and take ownership of every part of your life. You have the passion for training, start making this shit count. I know this is probably way off topic then what you wanted but I’m trying hard to get rid of all this bullshit that is plaguing SO MANY men, young men and boys. It comes down to this: ACT don't tell.  Think about it like this: training and life is something to be experienced by you.  You don't have to broadcast it to the world.
Training wise, I recommend this:
  • Stretch (mobility/flexibility/movement)
  • Lift
  • Sprint (aka condition)
Do the above all the time – no bulking, no cutting, no bullshit. Just train to be physically better. Don’t be that guy that takes shirtless photos of himself so other men can drool on them. That shit is a disgrace to every man that has done anything awesome in his life – while they were busy “doing” these shirtless ‘tards were busy trying to look the part. Get off the bench and get on the field.

Friday, April 14, 2017

Torso Strength

From Sean Waxman:
Last year I was asked to present at the NSCA Sports Specific Conference in Orlando on torso training for Baseball.  From my past experience with presenting at the NSCA, I knew that any talk which includes the words torso, core, or functional in its title attracts the functional training and physical therapists masquerading as a Strength Coach types like flies to shit.
Pissing-off these purveyors of weakness has become a hobby of mine. As I got up on stage and surveyed the audience, I knew there were going to be some folks with their panties in a bunch.
Below is the presentation I gave.
(Each number represents an individual slide with the title of the slide appearing next to it in bold. Following the title, is the transcript of my presentation)
Developing The Torso For Optimal Power And Strength Production in Baseball Players
“A sane coaches guide to ‘functional’ training”
1. Opening statement
Torso training, core training, functional training, corrective exercise – whatever you want to call it – have become industries unto themselves. There are entire training systems focused primarily on torso development. This would be fine if you were coaching a team of torsos. The truth is, training programs that isolate the torso are as effective for improving athletic performance as a program revolving around a thighmaster. It is my hope that after I am done you will have a better understanding of the role the torso plays when properly-designed training is implemented.
2. What Is The Function Of The Torso?
The torso is a conduit for transmitting energy. It does not produce energy itself. In ground-based sports such as baseball, all action is initiated by pushing against the ground. That energy travels through the lower body, through the torso and manifests in whatever action is required. The more efficient the energy flow through the body, the more effective the intended action. So the objective for torso development should be to create a medium in which energy flows efficiently. The torso can be the difference between home run and warning track power or throwing 89mph, not 94. However, in order for the torso to be the difference-maker, it needs to be addressed properly in training.
3. What The Science Says About Torso Training
The former Soviet Union is one of very few nations to have done longitudinal scientific research on strength and conditioning methods. From the 50’s through the late 80’s they dedicated their finest scientific minds to answer the question “how do you create maximal performance?” Through the 7 Olympic games the former Soviet Union competed in from 1960-1988 they dominated the events in which strength and power are the dominant characteristics. Because of the work of their sport scientists they were able to predict results within 90% accuracy. This was possible because they found a strong cause and effect relationship between particular training methods and results. And if you examine their training design, it includes little or no specialized torso training. In fact, many scientists and coaches felt that direct torso work was unwarranted because of how much the torso was involved in either stabilizing or moving some other part of the body during non-isolation exercises. They understood that the coach had a finite amount of time to work with an athlete since they had to spend more time practicing their actual sport. Through extensive scientific research and experimentation, these scientists discovered the most effective and efficient methods for improving performance.
I am not arrogant enough to claim that I am “ahead of the science” nor am I foolish enough to think what has worked for decades is, all of a sudden, ineffective. I’ll assume that the human body has not evolved all that much in the past 20 years. So that being the case, the body will respond to a training stimulus today the same way it did in 1980. Until someone puts in the time and effort to disprove the current accepted science, I will not waste my athletes’ or your time or money with unproven methods.
Before I continue I would like to establish some facts about athletic development:
4Fact Statement 1
Physical therapy (PT) protocols are designed to restore normal movement and function which has been threatened by injury.
5Fact Statement 2
Strength and conditioning protocols are designed to enhance normal movement and function to improve athletic attributes.
6Fact Statement 3
You cannot train a healthy athlete using PT protocols and expect to maximize athletic attributes.
7. Fact Statement 4
High repetition, low intensity training is not optimal for developing strength and power.
8. Fact Statement 5
The optimal rep range for developing strength and power is between 3-5 reps.
9. Fact Statement 6
The body is one unit comprised of a linked system of interactive muscle groups
10. Fact Statement 7
The most effective exercises to develop strength and power are squatting, pulling, and the Olympic lifts
11. Fact Statement 8
Squatting, pulling, and the Olympic lifts require the entire body to act as one complete unit
12. Fact Statement 9
The area between our neck and hip is part of this “unit.”
Keeping those facts in mind lets take a look at the problem with functional training.
13. The Problem With Current “Functional Training” Dogma and Why It Doesn’t Work
Much of the functional training information available today for the torso is based on PT protocols. As you know PT protocols are not effective for the training of athletes. If the purpose of torso development for sport is to develop a strong and powerful torso through which energy can easily flow, then “functional training” which is based on PT protocols cannot and does not accomplish this.
This type of training generally falls into three categories:
Bodyweight Stabilization Exercise
• This teaches isometric contraction for torso musculature, which is good, however it provides no progressive overload other than introducing unstable surfaces. The motor patterns developed through training on unstable surfaces are not the same motor patterns needed to stabilize on solid ground.
Spinal Flexion/Extension Exercises
• This is exactly the opposite of what is needed to develop a strong and stable torso. It is the ability to prevent movement of the torso that is needed, not flexion or extension.
Cable Column Training/Med Ball Training
• Provides the ability to train while standing and some progressive overload however, the lines of force are not axial, therefore the entire torso is not stressed.
14. Rotational Training and Weighted Bats
• One of the biggest mechanisms of torso injury occurs while flexing the spine during rotation. So If an athlete’s torso is not strong enough to prevent spinal flexion/extension then wouldn’t introducing rotational movements such as med-ball throws be foolish? Specific rotational exercise is an advanced form of training and should not be introduced into a program until the athlete has developed enough isometric strength in their torso to stabilize the spine. A better choice for training rotation would be barbell exercises. While an athlete rises from a squat or especially an overhead squat, they will be strongly resisting the tendency to rotate. This act of stabilization creates significant increases in rotational strength. As an athlete matures and gains control over their torso function, specific rotational exercises can be introduced. However, unlike in other rotational sports such as the shot put, hammer, and discus where the implement thrown will range between 16lbs and 4.4 lbs and specific rotational training may be beneficial, the heaviest object a baseball player will handle will be the bat, which will generally range between 30-40 oz. So aside from actually practicing hitting the baseball, it would seem unnecessary to spend the time in the weightroom on rotational training.
As far as using weighted bats, you are doing more harm than good. Adding weight to the bat changes the swing mechanics as well as the timing of the swing. And because of the extra weight, the muscles contract more slowly, therefore stimulating less type 2 fibers.
15. Sports-Specific Movements
I thought it necessary to discuss this idea of sports-specific torso training in the weightroom. This does not exist in weightroom. It is the job of the S&C coach to improve athletic attributes such as strength, power and speed. It is then the job of the baseball coach to teach the athlete the sports-specific movements. Doing a side toss with a med ball or rotational movements on a cable column is not the same as swinging a bat or throwing a ball. Throwing and hitting are very specific skills, which require very specific motor patterns, which you will not be able to replicate in the weightroom. In fact these rotational exercises create conflicting motor patterns and may very well negatively affect the athletes skill on the diamond.
Remember, in an untrained or under trained population nearly any training method will get a positive result for a short period of time. That doesn’t make it proper training
16. How To Develop The Torso
Because the body is a system of interactive muscle groups and the torso is part of that system, in order to correctly develop the torso you must improve the inter/intra muscular coordination and function of all the muscles that attach to the hip. If there is an issue with a muscle that attaches to the hip then torso function will be compromised. In my 18 years of S&C coaching I can say without hesitation that poor function and coordination of these muscles – and what I mean by poor function and coordination is tightness, imbalance, poor movement patterns, and weakness – can be attributed mostly to poor technique coaching or poor exercise choice by the S&C coach. Improper technique and exercise choice in the weightroom will do more to create muscle imbalances and weakness to the muscles that attach to the hip then anything else an athlete can do.
As the quality of your training program goes, so goes the quality of your torso training. The two are inseparable
The good news is: improving inter/intra muscular coordination and function are skills that can be improved in the weightroom by choosing exercises which require the entire body to act as one coordinated unit such as squatting pulling, and Olympic lifts. To perform these exercises properly, there must be efficient coordination and function of the muscles that attach to the hip. And when they are performed properly the body will use the most effective sequence of muscle contraction and relaxation as well as the proper amount isometric contraction of the torso to facilitate these movements efficiently.
There is a direct correlation between the efficiency of these movements and the athlete’s level of function. As far as the torso goes, you will see a dramatic transformation. There will be less unnecessary movement or muscle twitches while lifting. It will be like a piston.
The more ridged any material is, the more efficient energy flows through it. The torso is no exception. Another thing you will notice is improved bar velocity especially in the Olympic lifts. This is a bi-product of the combination of a well-developed torso meeting better muscular coordination.
17. Exercise Progression Overview 
Now I wanted to share with you the exercise progression I use to develop athletes and their torsos.
There are 3 phases with a total of 25 exercises. There is a definitive purpose for the order of the exercises in each phase as well as the phases themselves. Unfortunately, due to time constraints, I wont be able to discuss the details of the design however, I will be able to give you a thorough overview.
I start with the first exercise in phase one and work through each exercise until they all have been learned. Each exercise is designed to develop specific motor qualities. These specific qualities are chunked together to develop gross motor qualities.
18. Basic Barbell Exercises (Phase 1)
  • Back Squat
  • Standing Press 
  • Good Morning
  • Front Squat
  • Overhead Squat
  • RDL
  • Bent Over Row
  • Deadlift
  • *Push Press
19. Phase 1- General Purpose
  • Reinforces/teaches proper torso alignment
  • Muscular balance
  • Range of motion (improved connective tissue strength)
  • Improved force production (Strength)
  • Rotation Prevention
  • Inter/intra muscular coordination under controlled environment
  • Teaches/strengthens “ready position” for sport
  • <*Introduces energy flow (from the ground up)
19. Basic Barbell Exercises (Phase 2)
  • Hang Power Snatch
  • Hang Power Clean
  • Push Jerk
  • Power Snatch
  • Power Clean
  • Snatch
  • Clean
20. Phase 2- General Purpose=
  • Improved rate of force production (Power)
  • Introduces energy flow (from an external force to the ground)
21. Basic Barbell Exercises Bi-lateral (Phase 3)
  • Split Squat (bar in back)
  • Split Squat (bar in front)
  • Lunge (bar in back)
  • Lunge (bar in front)
  • Overhead Split Squat
  • Overhead Lunge (multiple directions)
  • *Split Snatch
  • *Split Clean
  • *Split Jerk
22. Phase 3 (General Purpose)
  • Addresses remaining bi-lateral deficit
  • Improved rotational strength
  • *Improved foot speed
22. Squatting
Unlike what some coaches might have you believe, the split squat or any other unilateral variations are not a suitable substitute for the back or front squat with beginning or intermediate athletes. Unilateral lifts are advanced exercises, which require a tremendous amount of pelvic control, much more than squatting with your feet in line. We have all heard the stories of athletes giving up the squat for a step-up or some other unilateral movement. And this does occur however these squat killers are overlooking a very key fact. If these athletes gave up the squat, it means that they had to have been squatting in the first place in order to have given it up. The truth is, in any sport other than powerlifting, there is such a thing as enough strength. In sports like baseball where the weight of the implements used do not vary in weight very much, at some point depending on the sport, increasing squat strength would be counterproductive. But to totally forgo the squat when developing a young or untrained athlete in lieu of the split squat and claim the split squat is more effective and safer is irresponsible and, more importantly, incorrect.Conclusion

If you ask coaches to break down success or failure in sport to one variable I believe it would be this; If you can get to the point of attack before your opponent, then your chances of success will greatly improve. It just so happens that this particular variable is exactly what an educated S&C coach can affect the most. Now I understand that there are other pieces to the S&C pie however the pieces are not cut evenly, and shouldn’t be. Many S&C coaches use a microscope in their approach to athletic development. They take a small part of the pie such as core or functional training and they make it the primary focus. The reality is that athletic development does not occur under a microscope or in isolation.
We are biological organisms that have numerous interrelated systems that respond in unison to particular stimuli in very specific ways. As coaches it is our responsibility to use stimuli that will have the greatest effect on our athlete’s ability to perform. Stimuli that will improve their athlete’s ability to get to the point of attack before their opponent.
If you use training that is properly designed using basic barbell exercises that are performed with correct technique, barring some physiological anomaly, you will hit most if not all of the pieces of the pie sufficiently.

And you will never again go to a presentation on torso development because you will understand that the very premise is ridiculous.
The coaches in attendance who actually understood the process of athletic development were very pleased with the presentation and were very complimentary.
The coaches who were pissed-off because I said barbell exercises are the best means for developing the torso, well… F**K UM!
Fight until your very last breath!
-Sean-
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Wednesday, June 15, 2016

42 Things

42 Things to Know 

by John Welbourn

I agree with all of this… Take the time to read them all and you will be a much better person at the end 😉 Thank you John!
1. Know what you are training for.
You need a goal, a destination for your journey. Pick a goal, chart a course, keep your head down and don’t come up for air until you meet it.
2. The squat is the foundation of any good program.
A program that does not involve the squat is incomplete. Any coach that tells you, you shouldn’t squat as it is bad for your back and knees, but if it is done you should not squat below parallel needs to be punched. Email me and I will send someone out who specializes in punching people who need a punch. And when I say squat, I mean the one where you put a heavy bar on your back. If I were talking about the front squat or overhead squat, I would have said front squat or overhead squat.
3. Be a performance whore.
Your only mark for progress should be performance and success. Don’t get caught up in dogma, realize all that matters is performance. Don’t get married to one philosophy or stuck in one circle. Look to expand your training arsenal and realize your only master is getting better.
4. “Know when to hold’em, know when to fold’em.”
When you start hitting the weights, certain days you feel like the weights are made of foam and you could lift the gym. Other days, the weights seem to be made of adamantium. Realize on the days when the weights are light, go for broke and set a new personal record regardless of what the program says. On the days when the opposite is true, all you need to do is survive and realize the weights will be there tomorrow.
5. Don’t fall prey to the Secret Squirrel Program.
This is what happens when late at night while scanning the internet you decided to hybrid CrossFit Football’s strength WOD with CFE’s running 2 days a week with CrossFit’s hero WODs and Outlaw’s Olympic programming just for good measure. All the while doing 23 hours a day of ketogenic interment fasting. If you think this secret squirrel program will help you become the fittest man on the planet you are delusional. All that will happen is you become a massive ball of injury, end up doing nothing but Mobility WOD for 2 years with the testosterone levels of a 14-year-old eunuch.
6. You need to warm up.
Warming up is key to raising core temperature and getting the muscles, tendons and fascia warm. You are warming up because you are preparing to train. Take the old boxing proverb to heart. “If you go into the ring cold, you come out cold.”
7. Use Lacrosse balls
If rolling out with a soft foam roller is painful, you have led a life of luxury and share the energy expenditure with a veal. Real athletes roll out with two lacrosse balls and Kelly Starrett sitting on your body part adjacent to it.
8. Static Stretching is great way to cool down. Period.
9. The first movement at the beginning of your training week needs to involve a heavy bar on your back.
10. All the machines and praying in the world will not build a physique like the one crafted from lifting free weights over 85% of your 1 RM.
11. Weighted Pull Ups can cure world hunger.
12. Isometric holds build stability and strength.
13. It is better to live like a farmer than a bartender.
Farmers go to bed when the sun goes down and wake when the roosters crow. Bartenders hang out with drunks, don’t go to bed till 3 or 4 in the morning and sleep all day. Be a farmer.
14. Heavy prowler pushes cleanse the soul.
15. Sleeping 8 hours or more a day makes you bullet proof.
Yes, if you sleep more than 8 hours a day, bullets will not harm you and you will be able to control the minds of those around you.
16. Shower in ice-cold water in the morning. Hot shower before bed.
17. Vitamin D is the most important vitamin of all, so go outside and get a tan. As George Robert’s dad once said, “Georgie, even fat looks good tan.”
18. The only proteins that count are the ones with faces, souls and a mother. I do not care how you process hemp and peas…it is not real protein.
19. Earn your carbs.
Don’t get lulled into thinking a primal or Paleo diet is low carb diet. If you are a hard charging athlete that lifts heavy weights, sprints and moves, eat some carbs. Low carb diets are for fat people and sedentary people with metabolic disorders. If you are training for the CrossFit Games, playing football or trying to run a hundred miles you have earned your carbs.
20. I don’t care how far or often you run, running slow will never help you get fast. The road to hell is paved with good intentions and marathon runners. I am not impressed that you finished a marathon in 5 hours. I am more impressed that it took you 7 hours to sprint 421 100-meter repeats.
21. Percentages are a waste of time for beginners.
Why you ask, because to efficiently lift a true 1 RM you need an extremely well training central nervous system. And efficiency in the CNS comes from prolonged training. Hence, how could a beginner have enough control over their body or their CNS to put forth the ability to lift a true 1 RM? They can’t. So don’t do it.
22. Every man should own a slow cooker and a grill that uses lump wood charcoal.
23. Meat from grass-fed cows should make up the bulk of your daily food consumption.
24. Drink water.
Anyone who tells you they don’t like to drink water needs to grow the fuck up. How much…at least 1 ounce per 2 lbs of body weight.
25.  Dont let fear be your limiting factor.
Louie Simmons told me, “To master kung fu, the training must be severe.” What Louie means is, don’t take the easy way out. Winners and champions are forged in the crucible of competition and hard work. Don’t let fear of not meeting your goals be your limiting factor when it comes to training or success.
26. Full Fat Greek Yogurt is an excellent source of protein and probiotics. Anyone that tells you dairy from pasture raised animals is bad, should be pushed in the mud.
27. Have the talent to rest.
If you think taking a rest day is weakness, you have never really trained hard. And you definitely have low testosterone levels.
28. The Second Amendment was put in place to guarantee the First Amendment. Problems arise when we allow our leaders to suspend the First Amendment and many other rights given to us in the Bill of Rights because of fear. When terrible things happen in society, we are so quick to give away our rights so the government can protect us and make it so it never happens again. It is impossible to stop bad people from doing bad things, but you can train and prepare for the day when good men are called upon to stop evil men. That is Edmund Burke.
29. Guns are inanimate objects that can be used to do harm. Much like cars, airplanes and knives, all these things can be turned into weapons if someone so chooses. Banning the sale, use or ownership of inanimate objects will no better cure the world of evil, and then eating low-fat food will cure a fat ass.
30. Lift heavy and awkward implements.
The power from picking up and lifting awkward and heavy objects creates a strength not found in a weight room. Anyone that grew up on a farm or wrestled or played football with farm kids knows what I am talking about. We also call this Field Strong.
31. Having kids puts everything into perspective.
My wife and I had twin girls in late 2011; I just came up for air in late 2012. Kids put things in perspective. The things that mattered so much, seem small and unimportant. What is important is raising your kids, providing a positive role model and keeping your wife happy and loved so she doesn’t drive the whole train off the tracks.
32. Learn to cook.
Even if it just involves adding meat, water, salt and root vegetables to a slow cooker or burning meat on a grill. Learn to cook. Nothing is as unimpressive as someone who cannot or will not learn.
33. Stop posting on message boards. If you have more than 100 posts on any message board, kick your own ass.
34. Twitter rocks.
If you can’t say it in a 140 characters, it doesn’t need to be said.
35. Training Vs. Testing.
Learn certain days are training days other days are testing days. Have a plan each day and realize professional athletes don’t compete everyday. They save that for when the money is on the line and the crowd is in the stands.
36. Read. Real. Books.
In this Internet age, digital books, periodicals, websites and blogs consume us. I feel something is missing, hard copy books.
37. Bacon.
I started eating bacon in the 70’s. I am not sure when many of you found bacon, but if it was last two years, I am sorry. Up until recently for many, bacon has been a mystery. But upon finding it, it is all they talk about. I am proud of you for finding bacon. I am sorry your dad didn’t make bacon on Saturdays when you were growing up. I believe it makes you feel primal and talking about bacon on social media is your way of thumbing your nose at society, but enough. Welcome to the party and guess what? We are serving bacon.
38. I don’t care that you are 100% Paleo; if a friend offers you a beer, drink it. Nothing says “FU” like not accepting a drink from a friend because of a diet. Grow the fuck up.
39. Work the tissue.
Active Release Therapy. Graston. Deep Tissue Massage. Mashing. Do something to mobilize tissue and speed recovery.
40. Move the bar as fast as possible.
When lifting weights, you should move the bar as fast as you can at all times. Think compensatory acceleration. If you have never head the term “compensatory acceleration”, go google it now. I will wait. Slow reps are akin to the splinters in your ass from sitting on the bench watching the explosive guys play. The only thing moving slow did, was make me slow. Fuck slow.
41. Don’t be a cartoon character.
In today’s age of social media and virtual existence, people are not held to the same standards they were so long ago. Individuals are more cartoon characters than real people. Be a real person that can be depended on and does not take every opportunity to take advantage of those around you. Being a man involves more than growing a beard and drinking whiskey…even those things do help.
42. High testosterone levels = nice guys.
I read a study a while back that related mental wellness and all around nice guys having higher testosterone levels than their male dick head counterparts. Next time you meet a douche bag, instead of cursing the day he was born, realize he is a lesser male and just has low testosterone levels. Pity him, because there is nothing worse for a man than having low testosterone levels. If you are reading this and think you might have low test levels, go see a doctor.

Friday, June 10, 2016

Get off the elliptical

Warning: Reducing intensity can be habit forming. Please consult your CrossFit trainer immediately.
You have to do Fran today.
Stop reading, close your eyes and really think about that for a moment.

Note the freefall feeling in your chest, the sweaty palms and the subtle changes in your breathing. 
Now consider this statement:
You have to do Fran in less than 12 minutes today. 
I bet you suddenly don’t feel nervous at all. You might even view the reps as a warm-up for another workout.
Same weight, same reps, same workout—different results.
Intensity burns. It tastes like a mouthful of old pennies soaked in battery acid. It makes you dizzy. It causes you to writhe around on the ground trying to work the misery out of your muscles. It usually requires a period spent on your back or butt, and sometimes it sends your lunch back the way it came in. Intensity gets caught in your throat and keeps you hacking hours after the workout ends.
Intensity also brings results. Push someone out of the comfort zone and physiology adapts. Do that regularly and fitness improves dramatically. After more than 15 years of workouts on CrossFit.com and six years of the CrossFit Games Open, we can make that statement with certainty backed by data.
Discomfort creates adaptation, but it can be very tempting to avoid the continuous discomfort needed to keep driving adaptation—even as a CrossFit athlete who knows its rewards.
Repetition creates habit, and you can adjust to almost anything—even fairly unpleasant stuff like Fran. I’m sure The Man in the Iron Mask was pretty uncomfortable for the first period of his imprisonment, but after a few years of metal, he was probably well used to flattening out his sandwiches so they would fit through the mouth slot.
Same deal with fitness. As we all know, “beginner’s gains” in CrossFit are the reward athletes are given simply for ditching inactivity or a stagnant fitness routine in favor of a superior regimen. When beginner’s gains evaporate and the nose must go right to the grindstone for sustained improvement in CrossFit, it can be tempting to get comfortable and step back from intensity. Not all the way back—just enough to take the edge off. Satisfaction with current output can reduce discomfort significantly—and limit results—while the quest for further improvements would bring great reward but also renewed acquaintance with that deep burning sensation.
Reducing intensity can be as subtle as breaking up Fran’s 15 thrusters when we don’t have to. It’s a very minor reduction in effort, and almost no one notices—sometimes not even the athlete. Fran burns a bit less, and only 20 seconds are added to a PR time, giving him or her the opportunity to attribute the score to an off day, bad sleep or “that third burrito at lunch.”
Luckily, the athlete still stays far fitter than if he or she hadn’t done Fran, but slacking off a little can lead to slacking off a lot, which is equivalent to treating a CrossFit workout like a 20-minute roll through the sports section while plodding on the elliptical machine.
I realized I was cutting with the wrong side of a very sharp knife a few weeks back in a workout that forced me to push myself:
100 wall-ball shots
Do 13 burpees after any broken set; no resting while holding the ball.
In that workout, my utter hatred of burpees forced me to complete my final set of 45 by pushing into the neighborhood of my physical limit. But my mental limit had come 30 reps into that last set, when I normally would have quit had the burpees not been present.
“I can’t finish this unbroken,” I thought before a coach saw me mentally crumbling and quickly advised that trading only 15 wall balls for 13 burpees plus 15 wall balls was a bad deal.
So I kept going, and while the 45th rep burned deeply, it was achievable. In fact, I had a few more in me. I had no idea—but my coach did.
The workout and the coach kicked me off the elliptical machine, so to speak, and they highlighted the fact that I’m capable of more than I think I am. I bet you’re more capable than you think you are, and your CrossFit coach knows it. Listen to him or her when you’re told to keep going and see what happens. When the coach says, “Do 5 more,” do 5 more—even if you think you’ll fail. I bet you won’t. I bet you’ll get fitter.
To get even further out of your CrossFit comfort zone, I’d encourage you to experiment with workouts similar to the wall-ball challenge detailed above.
Air Force, with 4 burpees preceding the work every minute, is a good example of a nowhere-to-hide workout.
Or try 500-meter rowing or 400-meter running repeats with a thruster penalty for every second under a certain challenging but achievable time.
Another option: Create a workout with a scheme about 2 reps out of your comfort zone and vow to do all sets unbroken. Fran at 23-17-11 might present an excellent challenge even if it lacks the mathematical grace of the original prescription.
Or you can create workouts in which a certain number of reps must be completed every 60 seconds. If you pick the right amount of work for your fitness level—say 15 wall-ball shots and 10 heavy kettlebell swings, for example—you’re going to have to work hard and go unbroken to get the work done in each minute.
To reap the greatest benefits from CrossFit, you have to be willing to push yourself, to be uncomfortable, to suffer for reward. And most of us are most of the time. The whiteboard and the rivalries thereon are powerful motivational tools. Still, a 5-minute Fran can become a habit if you let your mind trick you into dropping the barbell well before you need to.
Remember: Objects in motion tend to stay in motion, while objects at rest tend to head to the chalk bucket.
About the Author: Mike Warkentin is the managing editor of the CrossFit Journal and the founder of CrossFit 204.

Sunday, May 3, 2015

Hero Workouts

Hero WOD’s

CrossFit is quickly becoming “the training” program for our Military, Law Enforcement and Fire Fighters. Since day one CrossFit has embraced our men and women in uniform and they have chosen to honor the Heroes who gave their lives to keep us and our country safe.
These CrossFit Hero WODs listed below are some of the most intense workout experiences that you could experience. They have been conceived and are intended to be performed with intense effort, in honor of our fallen Heroes. Don’t think to your self, I can’t do that or it looks to hard. Instead focus on what you can do, scale where needed, and think about the Hero that has given his all for our freedom. Honor these Hero’s with your best effort. (to accommodate the growing number of Hero WOD’s, we have added a second page HERE.)
JT
Jeff Taylor21-15-9 reps, for time
Handstand push-ups
Ring dips
Push-ups
In honor of Petty Officer 1st Class Jeff Taylor, 30, of Little Creek, VA, who was killed in Afghanistan June 2005
Michael
Michael McGreevey3 rounds for time
Run 800 meters
50 Back Extensions
50 Sit-ups
In honor of Navy Lieutenant Michael McGreevy, 30, of Portville, NY, who was killed in Afghanistan June 28 2005.
Murph
Michael MurphyFor time
1 mile Run
100 Pull-ups
200 Push-ups
300 Squats
1 mile Run
Partition the pull-ups, push-ups, and squats as needed. Start and finish with a mile run. If you’ve got a twenty pound vest or body armor, wear it.
In memory of Navy Lieutenant Michael Murphy, 29, of Patchogue, N.Y., who was killed in Afghanistan June 28th, 2005. This workout was one of Mike’s favorites and he’d named it ‘Body Armor.’ From here on it will be referred to as ‘Murph’ in honor of the focused warrior and great American who wanted nothing more in life than to serve this great country and the beautiful people who make it what it is.
Daniel
Daniel Crabtree
For time
50 Pull-ups
400 meter run
95 pound Thruster, 21 reps
800 meter run
95 pound Thruster, 21 reps
400 meter run
50 Pull-ups
Dedicated to Army Sgt 1st Class Daniel Crabtree who was killed in Al Kut, Iraq on Thursday June 8th 2006.
Josh
Joshua Hager
For time
95 pound Overhead squat, 21 reps
42 Pull-ups
95 pound Overhead squat, 15 reps
30 Pull-ups
95 pound Overhead squat, 9 reps
18 Pull-ups
SSG Joshua Hager, United States Army, was killed Thursday February 22 2007 in Ar Ramadi, Iraq.
Jason
Jason Lewis100 Squats
5 Muscle-ups
75 Squats
10 Muscle-ups
50 Squats
15 Muscle-ups
25 Squats
20 Muscle-ups
S01 (SEAL) Jason Dale Lewis was killed by an IED while conducting combat operations in Southern Baghdad July 6, 2007. We name this workout “Jason” in honor of his life, family, and courage.
Badger
 Mark Carter
3 rounds for time
95 pound Squat clean, 30 reps
30 Pull-ups
Run 800 meters
In honor of Navy Chief Petty Officer Mark Carter, 27, of Virginia Beach, VA who was killed in Iraq 11 December 2007.
Joshie
Joshua Whitaker
3 rounds for time
40 pound Dumbbell snatch, 21 reps, right arm
21 L Pull-ups
40 pound Dumbbell snatch, 21 reps, left arm
21 L Pull-ups
The snatches are full squat snatches.
In honor of Army Staff Sergeant Joshua Whitaker, 23, of Long Beach, CA who was killed in Afghanistan May 15th, 2007
Nate
Nathan HardyAs many rounds as possible in 20 min
22 Muscle-ups
4 Handstand Push-ups
8 2-Pood Kettlebell swings
In honor of Chief Petty Officer Nate Hardy, who was killed Sunday February 4th during combat operations in Iraq. Nate is survived by his wife, Mindi, and his infant son Parker.
Randy
Randy Simmons75# power snatch, 75 reps for time
In honor of Randy Simmons, 51, a 27 year LAPD veteran and SWAT
team member who was killed February 6 in the line of duty. Our
thoughts and prayers go out to Officer Simmons’ wife and two children.
Tommy V
Tommy ValentineFor time
115 pound Thruster, 21 reps
15 ft Rope Climb, 12 ascents
115 pound Thruster, 15 reps
15 ft Rope Climb, 9 ascents
115 pound Thruster, 9 reps
15 ft Rope Climb, 6 ascents
In honor of Senior Chief Petty Officer Thomas J. Valentine, 37, of Ham Lake, Minnesota, died in an training accident in Arizona, on Feb. 13 2008.
Griff
SSgt Travis GriffinFor time
Run 800 meters
Run 400 meters backwards
Run 800 meters
Run 400 meters backwards
In honor of USAF SSgt Travis L. Griffin, 28, who was killed April 3, 2008 in the Rasheed district of Baghdad by an IED strike to his vehicle. Travis is survived by his son Elijah.
Ryan
Firefighter Ryan HummertFive rounds for time
7 Muscle-ups
21 Burpees Each burpee terminates with a jump 12 inches above max standing reach
Maplewood, Missouri Firefighter, Ryan Hummert, 22, was killed by sniper fire July 21st 2008 when he stepped off his fire truck responding to a call. He is survived by his parents Andrew and Jackie Hummert.
Erin
MCpl Erin DoyleFive rounds for time
40 pound Dumbbells split clean, 15 reps
21 Pull-ups
Canadian Army Master Corporal Erin Doyle, 32, was killed in a firefight August 11th, 2008 in the Panjwaii District, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his wife Nicole and his daughter Zarine.
Mr. Joshua
Joshua HarrisSO1 Joshua Thomas Harris, 36, drowned during combat operations, August 30th 2008 in Afghanistan. He is survived by his parents Dr. Sam and Evelyn Harris, his brother Ranchor and twin sister Kiki.
Five rounds for time
Run 400 meters
30 Glute-ham sit-ups
250 pound Deadlift, 15 reps
DT
Timothy DavisIn honor of USAF SSgt Timothy P. Davis, 28, who was killed on Feburary, 20 2009 supporting operations in OEF when his vehicle was struck by an IED. Timothy is survived by his wife Megan and one-year old son T.J.
Five rounds for time
155 pound Deadlift, 12 reps
155 pound Hang power clean, 9 reps
155 pound Push jerk, 6 reps
Danny
Daniel SakaiOakland SWAT Sergeant Daniel Sakai, age 35, was killed on March 21, 2009 in the line of duty along with fellow officers Sergeant Ervin Romans, Sergeant Mark Dunakin, and Officer John Hege. Daniel is survived by wife Jenni and daughter Jojiye.
As many rounds in 20 min of:
24″ box jump, 30 reps
115 pound push press, 20 reps
30 pull-ups
Hansen
Daniel HansenMarine Staff Sgt Daniel Hansen died February 14th in Farah Providence, Afghanistan when an IED he was working on detonated. Daniel is survived by his mother Sheryll, his father Delbert, his younger sister Katie, and his twin brother Matthew (also a Marine).
Five rounds for time
30 reps, 2 pood Kettlebell swing
30 Burpees
30 Glute-ham sit-ups
Tyler
Tyler Parten1LT Tyler E. Parten, 24, of Arkansas, died Sept. 10 in Konar province, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked his unit using rocket-propelled grenades and small arms fire. He was assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson, CO.
Five rounds for time
7 Muscle-ups
21 reps 95 pound Sumo-deadlift high-pull
Stephen
Stephen BouzaneThird Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry member Corporal Stephen Bouzane, 26, was killed by an IED strike June 20th, 2007 in the Panjwaii district in Afghanistan. He is survived by his parents Fred and Moureen Bouzane and his sister Kelly.
30-25-20-15-10-5 rep rounds for time
GHD sit-up
Back extension
Knees to elbow
95 pound Stiff legged deadlift
Garrett
Garrett LawtonMarine Capt. Garrett T. “Tubes” Lawton, 31, of Charleston, West Virginia was killed by an IED strike in Herat Province, Afghanistan on August 4, 2008. He is survived by his wife, Trisha, and two sons, Ryan, 6, and Caden, 4.
Three rounds for time
75 Squats
25 Ring handstand push-ups
25 L-pull-ups
War Frank
Warren A FrankCaptain Warren A. Frank, 26, of Cincinnati, Ohio, died November 25, 2008 while supporting combat operations in Ninewa province, Iraq. He was assigned to the 5th Air Naval Gunfire Liaision Company, III Marine Expeditionary Force, Okinawa, Japan. He is survived by his wife, Allison, and daughters Sophia Lynn and Isabella Grace.
Three rounds for time
25 Muscle-ups
100 Squats
35 GHD situps
McGhee
Ryan McGheeCorporal Ryan C. McGhee, 21, was killed in action on May 13, 2009 by small arms fire during combat in central Iraq. He served with 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment of Fort Benning, Ga. This was his fourth deployment, his first to Iraq. Ryan was engaged to Ashleigh Mitchell of Fredericksburg, VA. He is survived by his father Steven McGhee of Myrtle Beach S.C., his mother Sherrie Battle McGhee, and his brother Zachary.
As many rounds as possible in 30 min
275 pound Deadlift, 5 reps
13 Push-ups
9 Box jumps, 24 inch box
Paul
Paul John Rizzo Domenic Sciullo IIPittsburgh Police Officer Paul John Rizzo Domenic Sciullo II, 36, was shot and killed in the line of duty while responding to a domestic disturbance call on April 4, 2009. He was engaged to be married with Lisa Esposito.
Five rounds for time
50 Double unders
35 Knees to elbows
185 pound Overhead walk, 20 yards
Jerry
Jerry D PattonSgt Major Jerry Dwayne Patton, 40, died on 15 October 2008 during High Altitude High Opening (HAHO) training while assigned to Army USSOCOM preparing for deployment to Afghanistan. Jerry is survived by his wife Molly and his sons Chad, Cody, Chase and Connor.
For time
Run 1 mile
Row 2K
Run 1 mile
“Nutts”
Lieutenant Andrew Richard Nuttall, 30, from the 1st Battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (1 PPCLI), based in Edmonton, Alberta, serving as a member of the 1 PPCLI Battle Group was killed by an improvised explosive device that detonated during a joint foot patrol near the village of Nakhonay in Panjwaii District, about 25 km southwest of Kandahar City on December 23, 2009. He is survived by his parents, Richard and Ethel Jane Nuttall.
For time:
10 Handstand push-ups
250 pound Deadlift, 15 reps
25 Box jumps, 30 inch box
50 Pull-ups
100 Wallball shots, 20 pounds, 10′
200 Double-unders
Run 400 meters with a 45lb plate
“Arnie”
Los Angeles County Fire Fighter Specialist Arnaldo “Arnie” Quinones, 34, was killed in the line of duty on Sunday, August 30, 2009 during the Station Fire. His emergency response vehicle went over the side of the road and fell 800 feet into a steep canyon during fire suppression activities protecting Camp 16 outside the City of Palmdale, CA. He is survived by his wife Lori and daughter Sophia Grace, born three weeks after his death.
With a single 2 pood kettlebell:
21 Turkish get-ups, Right arm
50 Swings
21 Overhead squats, Left arm
50 Swings
21 Overhead squats, Right arm
50 Swings
21 Turkish get-ups, Left arm
“The Seven”
A suicide bomber killed seven CIA officers and one Jordanian officer at a remote base in southeastern Afghanistan on December 30, 2009 after posing as a potential informant reporting on Al Qaeda. Seven new stars will be etched onto the memorial wall at the CIA where every star represents grieving friends, family and colleagues dedicated to fight against the enemy, forever in their name.
Seven rounds for time of:
7 Handstand push-ups
135 pound Thruster, 7 reps
7 Knees to elbows
245 pound Deadlift, 7 reps
7 Burpees
7 Kettlebell swings, 2 pood
7 Pull-ups
RJ
Five rounds for time of:
Run 800 meters
15 ft Rope Climb, 5 ascents
50 Push-ups
Veteran LAPD officer and United States Marine Corps Reservist Sergeant Major Robert J Cottle, 45, was killed by an improvised explosive device while on patrol in Southern Afghanistan on Wednesday, March 24, 2010. RJ joined the Marines at age 18, and the LAPD in 1990. His various LAPD assignments included Hollywood Vice, Southeast Area, LAPD Dive Team and, most recently, SWAT. He is survived by his wife Emily and 9 month old daughter Kaila. The LAPD established a trust fund for them.
Luce
Wearing a 20 pound vest, three rounds for time of:
1K Run
10 Muscle-ups
100 Squats
Captain Ronald G. Luce, 27, of the U.S. Army Company C, 2nd Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group, headquartered at Jackson, Miss., died August 2, 2009 in Qole Gerdsar, Afghanistan, after his vehicle was struck by a command wire improvised explosive device. He is survived by by his wife Kendahl Shoemaker and 5 year old daughter Carrie, and parents Ronald and Katherine Luce.
Johnson
Complete as many rounds in 20 minutes as you can of:
245 pound Deadlift, 9 reps
8 Muscle-ups
155 pound Squat clean, 9 reps
1st Lt. Michael E. Johnson, 25, of the U.S. Marine Corps 7th Communications Battalion, 3rd Marine Headquarters Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force, headquartered in Okinawa, Japan, died September 8, 2009 while supporting combat operations in Kunar province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his wife Durinda Johnson.
Roy
Five rounds for time of:
225 pound Deadlift, 15 reps (women 155#)
20 Box jumps, 24 inch box
25 Pull-ups
Marine Corps Sgt. Michael C. Roy, 25, of North Fort Myers, Fla., assigned to the 3rd Marine Special Operations Battalion, Marine Special Operations Advisor Group, Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command at Camp Lejeune, was killed in action on July 8th, 2009 in Nimroz Province, Afghanistan, while supporting combat operations. He is survived by his wife Amy and three children, Michael, Landon and Olivia.
ADAM BROWN
Two rounds for time of:
295 pound Deadlift, 24 reps
24 Box jumps, 24 inch box
24 Wallball shots, 20 pound ball
195 pound Bench press, 24 reps
24 Box jumps, 24 inch box
24 Wallball shots, 20 pound ball
145 pound Clean, 24 reps
Navy Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Adam Lee Brown, 36, of Hot Springs, Arkansas, was killed on March 17th, 2010 in Komar Province, Afghanistan, in a battle against heavily armed militants. He is survived by his wife, Kelley, two children, Nathan and Savannah, and by his parents.
“Coe
Ten rounds for time of:
95 pound Thruster, 10 reps
10 Ring push-ups
Army Sgt. Keith Adam Coe, 30, of Auburndale, Fla., assigned to the 1st Battalion, 37th Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., died April 27th, 2010, in Khalis, Iraq, of wounds sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit with an explosive device. He is survived by his wife Katrina Coe, two sons, Killian and Keith Jr., and daughter, Klover.
“Severin”
50 Strict Pull-ups
100 Push-ups, release hands from floor at the bottom
Run 5K
If you’ve got a twenty pound vest or body armor, wear it.
U.S. Army Sergeant First Class Severin W. Summers III, 43, of Bentonia, Mississippi, assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group (Airborne), headquartered at Jackson, Mississippi, died August 2, 2009 in Qole Gerdsar, Afghanistan, after his vehicle was struck by a command wire improvised explosive device. Summers is survived by his wife Tammy Fraser and his daughters Jessica, Shelby & Sarah.
“Jack”
Complete as many rounds as possible in 20 minutes of:
115 pound Push press, 10 reps (85#-w)
10 KB Swings, 1.5 pood (1 pood-w)
10 Box jumps, 24 inch box (20 inch box – w)
Army Staff Sgt. Jack M. Martin III, 26, of Bethany, Oklahoma, assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group, Fort Lewis, Wash., died September 29th, 2009, in Jolo Island, Philippines, from the detonation of an improvised explosive device. Martin in survived by his wife Ashley Martin, his parents Jack and Cheryl Martin, and siblings Abe, Mandi, Amber and Abi.
“Forrest”
Three rounds for time of:
20 L-pull-ups
30 Toes to bar
40 Burpees
Run 800 meters
U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration Special Agent Forrest Nelson Leamon, 37, assigned to the Foreign-deployed Advisory and Support Team (FAST) Echo was killed October 26th, 2009, while on a counternarcotics mission in Western Afghanistan when the helicopter he was in crashed. He is survived by his wife Ana, his son Luke, his parents, Sue and Richard Leamon, and his sister Heather.
“Bulger”
Ten rounds of:
Run 150 meters
7 Chest to bar pull-ups
135 pound Front squat, 7 reps
7 Handstand push-ups
Canadian Forces Corporal Nicholas Bulger, 30, of Peterborough, Ontario, assigned to the 3rd Battalion of Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, based out of Edmonton, Alberta, died July 3, 2009 while on patrol in the Zhari district of Afghanistan when an improvised explosive device exploded near his vehicle. Cpl. Bulger is survived by his wife Rebeka, and daughters Brookelynn and Elizabeth.
Blake
Four rounds for time of:
100 foot Walking lunge with 45lb plate held overhead
30 Box jump, 24 inch box
20 Wallball shots, 20 pound ball
10 Handstand push-ups
U.S. Navy Senior Chief Cryptologic Technician David Blake McLendon, 30, of Thomasville, Georgia, assigned to Naval Special Warfare Group 2 Support Activity in Norfolk, Virginia, was killed September 21, 2010, in a helicopter crash during combat operations in the Zabul province of Afghanistan. McLendon is survived by his wife Kate McLendon, his parents David and Mary-Ann McLendon, his brother Chris McLendon, and his sister Kelly Lockman.
Collin
Six rounds for time of:
Carry 50 pound sandbag 400 meters
115 pound Push press, 12 reps
12 Box jumps, 24 inch box
95 pound Sumo deadlift high-pull, 12 reps
Navy Special Warfare Operator Chief Collin Trent Thomas, 33, of Morehead, Kentucky, assigned to a Navy SEAL team based out of Little Creek, Virginia, was fatally shot on August 18, 2010, during combat operations in Eastern Afghanistan. He is survived by his fiance Sarah Saunders, his parents Clay and Jean Thomas, and his sister Meghan Edwards.
Thompson
10 rounds for time of:
15 ft Rope Climb, 1 ascent
95 pound Back squat, 29 reps
135 pound barbells Farmer carry, 10 meters
Begin the rope climbs seated on the floor.
U.S. Army Captain David J. Thompson, 39, of Hooker, Oklahoma, commander of Operational Detachment Alpha 3334, Company C, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), based in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, was killed on January 29, 2010, while supporting combat operations in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan. Thompson is survived by his wife, Emily, their two daughters, Isabelle and Abigail, his parents, Charles and Freida, and his sister Alisha Mueller.
“Whitten”
Five rounds for time of:
22 Kettlebell swings, 2 pood
22 Box jump, 24 inch box
Run 400 meters
22 Burpees
22 Wall ball shots, 20 pound ball
Army Captain Dan Whitten, 28, of Grimes, Iowa, assigned to the 1st Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, based out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died February 2, 2010, when enemy forces in Zabul, Afghanistan, attacked his vehicle with an improvised explosive device. Whitten is survived by his wife, Starr Whitten, his mother, Jill Whitten, his father, Dan Whitten, and his sister, U.S. Army Captain Sarah Whitten.
“Bull”
Two rounds for time of:
200 Double-unders
135 pound Overhead squat, 50 reps
50 Pull-ups
Run 1 mile
U.S. Marine Corps Captain Brandon “Bull” Barrett, 27, of Marion, Indiana, assigned to the 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, based out of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, was killed on May 5, 2010, while supporting combat operations in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his parents Cindy and Brett Barrett, his sisters Ashley and Taylor Barrett, his brother Brock Barrett, and his grandmother Carmen Johnson.
Complete as many rounds as possible in 20 minutes of:
225 pound Deadlift, 6 reps
7 Burpee pull-ups
10 Kettlebell swings, 2 pood
Run 200 meters
U.S. Marine Corps Sergeant John Rankel, 23, of Speedway, Indiana, assigned to 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1 Marine Expeditionary Force, based out of Camp Pendleton, California, was killed on June 7, 2010, while supporting combat operations in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He is survived by mother and stepfather Don and Trisha Stockhoff; father and stepmother, Kevin and Kim Rankel; and brothers Nathan Stockhoff and Tyler Rankel.
Ten rounds, each for time of:
115 pound Thruster, 5 reps
10 Pull-ups
100 meter Sprint
Rest 1 minute
Score is your fastest and slowest round.
U.S. Army Captain Jason Holbrook, 28, of Burnet, Texas, assigned to 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), based out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina, was killed on July 29th, 2010 in Tsagay, Afghanistan when insurgents attacked his vehicle with an improvised explosive device. He is survived by his wife Heather Holbrook and his parents Joan and James Holbrook.
Complete as many rounds as possible in 20 minutes of:
5 Parallette handstand push-ups
10 Toes through rings
20 pound Medicine ball cleans, 15 reps
Narcotics Detective and Special Assignment Unit Operator Carlos Ledesma, 34, of the Chandler Police Department, Chandler, Arizona, was shot and killed by drug dealers on July 28, 2010, during an undercover operation in Phoenix, Arizona. He is survived by his wife Sherry and sons Luciano and Elijo.
Seven rounds for time of:
1.5 pood Kettlebell swing, 15 reps
95 pound Power clean, 15 reps
15 Box jumps, 24″ box
U.S. Army Sergeant Jeremiah Wittman, 26, of Darby, Montana, assigned to the 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, based out of Fort Carson, Colorado, was killed on February 13, 2010, when insurgents attacked his unit with a roadside bomb in Zhari province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his daughters Miah and Ariauna, wife Karyn, siblings Robert H., Charity, Jenell, and Natasha, father Robert, and mother Cynthia Church.
Three rounds of:
9 Muscle-ups
15 Burpee pull-ups
21 Pull-ups
Run 800 meters
If you’ve got a twenty pound vest or body armor, wear it.
U.S. Army Sergeant Jason “Mick” McCluskey, 26, of McAlester, Oklahoma, assigned to the 27th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade, XVIII Airborne Corps, based out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina, was killed on November 4, 2010, when insurgents attacked his unit with small arms fire in Zarghun Shahr, Mohammad Agha district, Afghanistan. He is survived by his son Landen, and his mother Delores Olivares.
Four rounds for time of:
10 L-pull-ups
15 Push-ups
15 Chest to bar Pull-ups
15 Push-ups
20 Pull-ups
15 Push-ups
U.S. Army First Lieutenant Todd W. Weaver, 26, of Hampton, Virginia, assigned to the 1st Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), based out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died on September 9, 2010, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with a roadside bomb in Kandahar, Afghanistan. He is survived by his wife Emma, daughter Kiley, parents Don and Jeanne, and siblings Glenn, Adrianna, and Christina.
Run 1 mile
155 pound Clean and jerk, 21 reps
Run 800 meters
155 pound Clean and jerk, 21 reps
Run 1 Mile
U.S. Marine Corps Sergeant Matthew T. Abbate, 26, of Honolulu, Hawaii, assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, based out of Camp Pendleton, California, was killed on December 2, 2010, while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his wife Stacie Rigall, son Carson, mother Karen Binion, father Salvatore Abbate, and siblings Dominica Abbate, Elliot Abbate, Valerie Binion, and Kelly Binion.
HeroMichaelBordelon1_th.jpgFive rounds, each for time, of:
135 pound Power clean, 5 reps
135 pound Front squat, 10 reps
135 pound Jerk, 5 reps
20 Pull-ups
Rest 90 seconds
U.S. Army First Sergeant Michael “Hammer” Bordelon, 37, of Morgan City, Louisiana, assigned to the 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division (Stryker Brigade Combat Team), based out of Fort Lewis, Washington, died on May 10, 2005, from injuries sustained when a car bomb exploded near him in Mosul, Iraq on April 23, 2005.  He is survived by his wife Mila; children Mike Jr., Jacob, and Johanna; mother Dolores; and sister Doreen Scioneaux.
HeroDavidMooreMedalOfValor_th.jpgComplete as many rounds in 20 minutes as you can of:
15 ft Rope Climb, 1 ascent
Run 400 meters
Max rep Handstand push-up
Score number of handstand push-ups completed for each round.
Officer David S. Moore, 29, of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, died on January 26, 2011 from gunshot wounds suffered on January 23, 2011 when he stopped a stolen vehicle and the driver opened fire at him. He is survived by his mother Jo Ann, father Spencer, and sister Carol Bongfeldt.
ColinWilmotHero_th.jpgSix rounds for time of:
50 Squats
25 Ring dips
Canadian Forces Private Colin Wilmot, 24, of Fredericton, New Brunswick, assigned to the Second Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (2 PPCLI) Battle Group, based out of Edmonton, Alberta, died on July 6, 2008 from wounds suffered when an explosive device detonated near him in the Panjwali District of Afghanistan.
He is survived by his fiancee Laura, father Eric Craig, and sister Kathleen.
HeroMoon_th.jpgSeven rounds for time of:
40 pound dumbbell Hang split snatch, 10 reps Right arm
15 ft Rope Climb, 1 ascent
40 pound dumbbell Hang split snatch, 10 reps Left arm
15 ft Rope Climb, 1 ascent
Alternate feet in the split snatch sets.
U.S. Army Specialist Christopher Moon, 20, of Tucson, Arizona, assigned to 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, based out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died on July 13, 2010, from injuries sustained on July 6, 2010 in Arghandab, Afghanistan when insurgents attacked his vehicle with an improvised explosive device. He is survived by his parents Marsha and Brian and sister Sunday.
MarcSmallHero_th.jpgThree rounds for time of:
Row 1000 meters
50 Burpees
50 Box jumps, 24″ box
Run 800 meters
U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Marc Small, 29, of Collegeville, Pennsylvania, assigned to 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), based in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died on February 12, 2009, from wounds sustained when insurgents attacked his unit with a rocket-propelled grenade launcher and small arms fire in Faramuz, Afghanistan. He is survived by his father and stepmother, Murray and Karen, mother and stepfather, Mary and Peter MacFarland, and fiancee Amanda Charney.
ScottMorrisonHero_th.jpg50-40-30-20 and 10 rep rounds of:
Wall ball shots, 20 pound ball
Box jump, 24 inch box
Kettlebell swings, 1.5 pood
U.S. Army Specialist Scott Morrison, 23, of Blue Ash, Ohio, assigned to 584th Mobility Augmentation Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade, based out of Fort Hood, Texas, died on September 26, 2010, from injuries suffered on September 25 when insurgents in Kandahar, Afghanistan attacked his vehicle with an improvised explosive device. He is survived by his father Donald, mother Susan, brother Gary, and sister Katie.
Gator
ChrisGathercoleHero_th.jpgEight rounds for time of:
185 pound Front squat, 5 reps
26 Ring push-ups
U.S. Army Specialist Christopher “Gator” Gathercole, 21, of Santa Rosa, California, assigned to 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, based in Fort Lewis, Washington, was killed by enemy fire on May 26, 2008, in Ghazni, Afghanistan. He is survived by his brother Edward, sisters Jennifer Daly and Sarah Ferrell, father Edward Gathercole, and mother Catherine Haines.
BradleySmithHero_th.jpg10 rounds for time of:
Sprint 100 meters
10 Pull-ups
Sprint 100 meters
10 Burpees
Rest 30 seconds
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Bradley R. Smith, 24, of Troy, Illinois, assigned to the 10th Air Support Operations Squadron, based in Fort Riley, Kansas, was killed on January 3, 2010, by an improvised explosive device in Zhari district, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his wife Tiffany, daughter Chloe, parents Gary and Paula, and brother Ryan.
JoshMeadowsHero_th.jpgFor time:
20 Muscle-ups
25 Lowers from an inverted hang on the rings, slowly, with straight body and arms
30 Ring handstand push-ups
35 Ring rows
40 Ring push-ups
U.S. Marine Corps Captain Joshua S. Meadows, 30, of Bastrop, Texas, assigned to 1st Marine Special Operations Battalion, Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command, based in Camp Pendleton, California, was killed by enemy fire on September 5, 2009 in Farah Province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his wife Angela, daughter Olivia, mother Jan, and sister Erin.
Santiago
AnibalSantiagoHero_th.jpgSeven rounds for time of:
35 pound Dumbbell hang squat clean, 18 reps
18 Pull-ups
135 pound Power clean, 10 reps
10 Handstand push-ups
U.S. Army Sergeant Anibal Santiago, 37, of Belvidere, Illinois, assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, stationed in Fort Benning, Georgia, died on July, 18, 2010, in Bagram, Afghanistan. He is survived by his wife, Mandy, sons Hannibal, Desmond, and Darian, and parents Anibal and Maria.
NathanCarseHero_th.jpg21-18-15-12-9-6-3 reps for time of:
95 pound Squat clean
Double-under
185 pound Deadlift
24″ Box jump
Begin each round with a 50 meter Bear crawl.
U.S. Army Corporal Nathan B. Carse, 32, of Harrod, Ohio, assigned to the 2nd Engineer Battalion, 176th Engineer Brigade, based out of White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, died in Kandahar, Afghanistan, on February 8, 2011, from wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using an improvised explosive device. He is survived by his mother Janis and sisters Megan Brown and Kristin Purdy.
Bradshaw
BrianBradshawHero_th.jpg10 rounds for time of:
3 Handstand push-ups
225 pound Deadlift, 6 reps
12 Pull-ups
24 Double-unders
U.S. Army First Lieutenant Brian Bradshaw, 24, of Steilacoom, Washington, assigned to the 1st Battalion, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Airborne Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, based in Fort Richardson, Alaska, died in Kheyl, Afghanistan, on June 25th, 2009, from wounds suffered when insurgents detonated a roadside bomb near his vehicle. He is survived by his parents, Paul and Mary, and brother Robert.
LtWhiteHero_th.jpgFive rounds for time of:
15′ Rope climb, 3 ascents
10 Toes to bar
21 Walking lunge steps with 45lb plate held overhead
Run 400 meters
U.S. Army First Lieutenant Ashley White, 24, of Alliance, Ohio, assigned to the 230th Brigade Support Battalion, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team, North Carolina National Guard, based in Goldsboro, North Carolina, died on October 22, 2011 in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, from wounds suffered when insurgents attacked her unit with an improvised explosive device. She is survived by her husband Captain Jason Stumpf, her parents Robert and Deborah, brother Josh, and sister Brittney.
JasonSantoraHero_th.jpgThree rounds for reps of:
155 pound Squat cleans, 1 minute
20′ Shuttle sprints (20′ forward + 20′ backwards = 1 rep), 1 minute
245 pound Deadlifts, 1 minute
Burpees, 1 minute
155 pound Jerks, 1 minute
Rest 1 minute
U.S. Army Sergeant Jason A. Santora, of Farmingville, New York, assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, based out of Fort Benning, Georgia, died in Logar province, Afghanistan on April 23, 2010, from wounds sustained during a firefight with insurgents. He is survived by his parents Gary and Theresa, and sister Gina.
BrettWoodHero_th.jpg5 Rounds for time of:
Run 400 meters
10 Burpee box jumps, 24″ box
95 pound Sumo-deadlift high-pull, 10 reps
95 pound Thruster, 10 reps
Rest 1 minute
Australian Army Sergeant Brett Wood, 32, of Ferntree Gully, Victoria, assigned to the 2nd Commando Regiment, based in Sydney, New South Wales, died on May 23, 2011, in Helmand province, Afghanistan, after insurgents attacked him with an improvised explosive device. He is survived by his wife Elvi, his mother Allison, and his father David. Donations can be made in his name to the Commando Welfare Trust.
DarenHidalgoHero_th.jpgFor time:
Run 2 miles
Rest 2 minutes
135 pound Squat clean, 20 reps
20 Box jump, 24″ box
20 Walking lunge steps with 45lb plate held overhead
20 Box jump, 24″ box
135 pound Squat clean, 20 reps
Rest 2 minutes
Run 2 miles
If you’ve got a twenty pound vest or body armor, wear it.
U.S. Army First Lieutenant Daren M. Hidalgo, 24, of Waukesha, Wisconsin, assigned to 3rd Squadron, 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment, based in Vilseck, Germany, died on February 20, 2011, in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, from wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device. Two weeks prior to his death, he was hit by an earlier improvised explosive device. Despite his injuries, he stayed in country and on patrols rather than return home. He is survived by his father Jorge, mother Andrea, brothers Miles and Jared, and sister Carmen.
WilliamRuddHero_th.jpgComplete as many rounds as possible in 20 minutes of:
10 Pull-ups
75 pound dumbbell Deadlift, 5 reps
135 pound Push-press, 8 reps
U.S. Army Sergeant William “Ricky” Rudd, 27, of Madisonville, Kentucky, assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, based in Fort Benning, Georgia, died on October 5, 2008, from wounds suffered from enemy small arms fire while on a combat patrol in Mosul, Iraq. He is survived by his father William, stepmother Barbara Rudd, step brother Josh, mother Pamela Lam, and sister Elizabeth.
SFCParkHero_th.jpgThree rounds for time of:
Run 800 meters with a 45 pound barbell
15 foot Rope climb, 3 ascents
135 pound Thruster, 12 reps
U.S. Army Sergeant First Class Dae Han Park, 36, of Watertown, Connecticut, assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), based out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, died on March 12, 2011 in Wardak province, Afghanistan, from wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device. He is survived by his wife, Mi Kyong, daughters Niya and Sadie, parents Joseph and Bonnie, and siblings Katie and Saejin.
JoshuaDesforgesHero_th.jpgFive rounds for time of:
225 pound Deadlift, 12 reps
20 Pull-ups
135 pound Clean and jerk, 12 reps
20 Knees to elbows
U.S. Marine Corps Sergeant Joshua Desforges, 23, of Ludlow, Massachusetts, assigned to 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, based in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, was killed on May 12, 2010, while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his parents David and Arlene, and his loving sister Janelle
Hero_GregoryRahoi_th.jpgComplete as many rounds as possible in 12 minutes of:
24 inch Box Jump, 12 reps
95 pound Thruster, 6 reps
6 Bar-facing burpees
U.S. FBI Supervisory Special Agent Gregory J. Rahoi, 38, of Brookfield, Wisconsin, assigned to the Hostage Rescue Team, based in Quantico, Virginia, was killed on December 6, 2006, during a live-fire tactical training exercise at Fort A.P. Hill, near Bowling Green, Virginia. He is survived by his parents, Natalie and Richard, sister Teri, and fiancee Paula Paulk.
Hero_DelCastillo_th.jpg
For Time:
25 Burpees
Run 400 meters with a 20 pound medicine ball
25 Weighted pull-ups with a 20 pound dumbbell
Run 400 meters with a 20 pound medicine ball
25 Handstand push-ups
Run 400 meters with a 20 pound medicine ball
25 Chest-to-bar pull-ups
Run 400 meters with a 20 pound medicine ball
25 Burpees
U.S. Army First Lieutenant Dimitri Del Castillo, 24, of Tampa, Florida, assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, based in Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, died on June 25, 2011, in Kunar province, Afghanistan, from wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with small arms fire. He is survived by his wife Katie, his parents Mr. and Mrs. Carlos E. Del Castillo, his brother Carlos Andres and sister Anna.
Hero_Pheezy_th.jpg
Three rounds for time of:
165 pound Front squat, 5 reps
18 Pull-ups
225 pound Deadlift, 5 reps
18 Toes-to-bar
165 pound Push jerk, 5 reps
18 Hand-release push-ups
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Corporal Philip P. Clark, 19, of Gainesville, Florida, assigned to 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, based in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, died on May 18, 2010, while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his wife, Ashton, father Mike and stepmother Tammy, mother Rosmari Kruger, and brothers Tyler, Kyle and Ryan Nordyke.
Hero_MarkForester_th.jpg
For time:
Run 800 meters
28 Kettlebell swings, 2 pood
28 Strict Pull-ups
28 Kettlebell clean and jerk, 2 pood each
28 Strict Pull-ups
Run 800 meters
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Mark Forester, 29, of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, assigned to the 21st Special Tactics Squadron, based in Pope Air Force Base, North Carolina, died on September 29, 2010, while conducting combat operations in Uruzgan province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his parents Ray and Pat, and siblings Terri, David, Joseph and Thad.
Hero_BrianBill_th.jpgThree rounds for time of:
15 foot Rope climb, 5 ascents
185 pound Back squat, 25 reps
U.S. Navy Special Warfare Operator Chief Petty Officer (SEAL) Brian R. Bill, 31, of Stamford, Connecticut, assigned to an East Coast-based Naval Special Warfare unit, died on August 6, 2011, of wounds suffered when his unit’s helicopter crashed in Wardak province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his mother Patricia Parry and her husband Dr. Michael Parry, his father Scott, and siblings Christian, Amy, Andrea, Kerry, Tessa, and Morgan.
Nick_Steinbacher_smile_th.jpg
12 rounds for time of:
45 pound Dumbbell hang squat clean, 10 reps
6 Handstand push-ups on dumbbells
U.S. Army Specialist Nicholas P. Steinbacher, 22, of La Crescenta, California, assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, based in Fort Hood, Texas, died on December 10, 2006 of injuries suffered when insurgents attacked his Humvee with an improvised explosive device in Baghdad, Iraq. He is survived by his parents Paul and Carolyn, and brothers Dan and Kirk.
Hero_PO1MichaelMikieStrange_th.jpgEight rounds for time of:
600 meter Run
1.5 pood Weighted pull-up, 11 reps
11 Walking lunge steps, carrying 1.5 pood kettlebells
1.5 pood Kettlebell thruster, 11 reps
U.S. Navy Cryptologist Technician (Collection) Petty Officer 1st Class (Expeditionary Warfare Specialist) Michael J. Strange, 25, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, assigned to an East Coast-based Naval Special Warfare unit, died on August 6, 2011, of wounds suffered when his unit’s helicopter crashed in Wardak province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his fiancee Breanna Hostetler, parents Elizabeth and Charles, and siblings Katelyn, Carly, and Charles.
“Lumberjack 20″
Lumberjacks
20 Deadlifts (275lbs/185lbs)
Run 400m
20 KB swings (2pood/1.5pood)
Run 400m
20 Overhead Squats (115lbs/75lbs)
Run 400m
20 Burpees
Run 400m
20 Pullups (Chest to Bar)
Run 400m
20 Box jumps (24″/20″)
Run 400m
20 DB Squat Cleans (45lbs/30lbs each)
Run 400m
On Nov. 5 2009 at 1:34 p.m., a terrorist named Major Nidal Hasan attacked fellow soldiers and civilians at Fort Hood, TX. He killed 12 soldiers and one civilian and wounded 43 others. – Spc. Frederick Greene, 29, of Mountain City, Tennessee, Pfc. Aaron Thomas Nemelka, 19, of West Jordan, Utah, Pfc. Michael Pearson, 22, of Bolingbrook, Illinois, and Spc. Kham Xiong, 23, of St. Paul, Minnesota, along with eleven of the wounded were active CrossFitters in the 20th Engineer Battalion, home to Lumberjack CrossFit.
HeroTimothyBrenton_th.jpgFive rounds for time of:
Bear crawl 100 feet
Standing broad-jump, 100 feet
Do three Burpees after every five broad-jumps. If you’ve got a twenty pound vest or body armor, wear it.
Field Training Officer Timothy Quinn Brenton, 39, of the Seattle Police Department, was shot and killed in a drive-by shooting while on duty on October 31, 2009. He is survived by his wife Lisa, his son Quinn, and daughter Kayliegh.
JonTumilson_th.jpeg
8 rounds for time of:
Run 200 meters
11 Dumbbell burpee deadlifts, 60 pound dumbbells
U.S. Navy Special Warfare Operator Petty Officer 1st Class (SEAL/Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist) Jon “JT” Thomas Tumilson, 35, of Rockford, Iowa, assigned to an East Coast-based Naval Special Warfare unit, died on August 6, 2011, in Wardak province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when his helicopter crashed. He is survived by his parents George and Kathy Tumilson, Joy and Scott McMeekan, sisters Kristie and Joy, and his dog Hawkeye.
Hero_SgtShipway_th.jpegNine rounds for time of:
185 pound Squat clean, 7 reps
8 Burpee box jumps, 36″ box
Canadian Forces Sergeant Prescott Shipway, 36, of Esterhazy, Saskatchewan, Canada, assigned to the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, based in Shilo, Manitoba, Canada, was killed on September 7, 2008 by a roadside bomb in Kandahar province, Afghanistan.
Jared
Hero_JaredVanAaslt_th.jpeg4 rounds for time of:
Run 800 meters
40 Pull-ups
70 Push-ups
U.S. Army Master Sergeant Jared N. Van Aalst, 34, of Laconia, New Hampshire, assigned to the U.S. Army Special Operations Command, based in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died August 4, 2010, in Kunduz province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered while his unit was conducting combat operations. He is survived by his wife, Katie Van Aalst, his daughters Kaylie and Ava, and a posthumous son, Hugh Jared.
Tully
Hero_MikeTully_th.jpegFour rounds for time of:
Swim 200 meters
40 pound Dumbbell squat cleans, 23 reps
U.S. Army Sergeant First Class Michael J. Tully, 33, of Falls Creek, Pennsylvania, assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), based in Fort Lewis, Washington, died on August 23, 2007, in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds sustained from an improvised explosive device. He is survived by his son Slade.
Hero_SSGAaronHolleyman_th.jpeg30 rounds for time of:
5 Wall ball shots, 20 pound ball
3 Handstand push-ups
225 pound Power clean, 1 rep
U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Aaron N. Holleyman, 27, of Glasgow, Montana, assigned to the 1st Battalion, 5th Special Forces Group, based in Fort Campbell, Kentucky, was killed on August 30, 2004, when his military vehicle hit an improvised explosive device in Khutayiah, Iraq. He is survived by his daughters Shelby and Erin, son Zachary, parents Ross and Glenda, and siblings Kelly and Daniel.
Adrian
Hero_AdrianElizalde_th.jpegSeven rounds for time of:
3 Forward rolls
5 Wall climbs
7 Toes to bar
9 Box jumps, 30″ box
U.S. Army Sergeant First Class Adrian Elizalde, 30, of North Bend, Oregon, assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), based in Fort Lewis, Washington, died on August 23, 2007, in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds sustained from an improvised explosive device. He is survived by his parents, Jorge and Teresa Elizalde, sister Rachel, and daughter Sydney Grace.
Glen
Hero_GlenDoherty_th.jpegFor time:
135 pound Clean and jerk, 30 reps
Run 1 mile
15 foot Rope climb, 10 ascents
Run 1 mile
100 Burpees
Former U.S. Navy SEAL Glen Doherty, 42, of Winchester, Massachusetts, assigned to a State Department security detail in Benghazi, Libya, died in an attack on a U.S. consulate on September 11, 2012. He is survived by his parents, Ben and Barbara, sister Katie, and brother Greg.
Tom
TomHidesite_Hero_th.jpegComplete as many rounds in 25 minutes as you can of:
7 Muscle-ups
155 pound Thruster, 11 reps
14 Toes-to-bar
U.S. Army First Lieutenant Thomas M. Martin, 27, of Ward, Arkansas, assigned to the 1st Squadron, 40th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, based in Fort Richardson, Alaska, died on October 14, 2007 in Al Busayifi, Iraq, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with small arms fire. He is survived by his parents, Edmund and Candis Martin; sisters Sarah Hood, Becky Martin, and Laura Martin; fiancee, Erika Noyes; and grandmother, E. Jean Martin.
Courtesy of CrossFit Inc.
“Moose” (courtesy of our friends at Bear River CrossFit)
1000 Meter Row (To Represent his joining of the U.S. Army in 2010)
then (10x)
7 Bar Facing Burpee’s (7 to represent the month of July that he was K.I.A.)
3 Thrusters (95#/65#) (3 to represent the day in which he was K.I.A.)
10 Rounds
then
1200 Meter Run (with Weighted Vest or Med. Ball 20#/14#)
PFC. Cody O. Moosman, 24, of Preston, Idaho, died July 3 2012, in Gayan Alwara Mandi, Afghanistan. Moosman was on duty in a guard tower when enemy forces attacked his unit with small arms fire. Moosman, who is believed to have been on his first tour, was hit by small arms fire and died shortly after the attack occurred. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kansas. His family issued a statement saying their son told them starting in the third grade that he had wanted to be in the Army. He joined in 2010, at age 22, and loved the idea of protecting his fellow citizens.  He was an avid hunter and fisherman and had completed his Eagle Scout badge. Moosman’s unit was deployed in a resistive region near the border with Pakistan.